Journal Article

Asylum papers in hand, Raz Mohammad Aryubi recalled his arrival in Austria from his native Afghanistan in spring 2014, and how, at 21, he is now studying for an M.B.A. at the University of Vienna. But his feeling of security in the country he wishes to make his home evaporated, he said, when he saw what happened in Paris.

A growing number of politicians in the United States have used last Friday's terrorist attacks in France to argue for tighter restrictions, if not an outright halt, on accepting Syrian refugees. But in France itself, the government is keeping its doors open.

Slovenia began erecting a razor-wire fence at its border with Croatia on Wednesday to stem the inflow of migrants, as winter closes in and countries to the north tighten their own border controls.

Along the Sahara trail that tens of thousands of Africans take each year to reach the shores of Italy, Europe is paying for a pit stop, of sorts — one that it hopes will give these young people on the move a reason to go back home.

The European Union was closing in on a deal Wednesday to return more migrants to Africa, but there was skepticism that the plan would meet the goal of reducing the numbers of refugees arriving in Germany, Scandinavia and other destinations.

President Obama’s plan to shield millions of illegal immigrants from deportation may be in legal limbo, but that’s not stopping advocates for the undocumented, who are planning a new wave of events celebrating the initiative’s one-year anniversary.

Somewhere right now, in a refugee camp in Amman or a rental apartment in Beirut or on a street in Istanbul, sits a Syrian hoping to be among the 25,000 people resettled to Canada, possibly by the end of the year. United Nations staff working with the Canadian government to figure out who will be on the planes or ships dispatched to the region in the coming weeks say they are trying to keep expectations realistic.

Britain yesterday began the process of deporting migrants camped at a British military base in Cyprus, triggering the threat of a mass hunger strike. Members of the group, which crossed the Mediterranean from Lebanon on two small boats almost three weeks ago, were warned in a letter that they would be returned to Beirut because they had chosen not to claim asylum in Cyprus.

Britain is to spend almost half a billion pounds to stem the flow of migrants across the Mediterranean. Ministers will announce £275 million of funding today to help Turkish officials deal with hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees over the next two years, as a two-day global summit on the crisis closes in Malta. At a working dinner in Valletta last night, David Cameron also pledged to use £200 million of British aid money to help African countries tackle migration.

David Cameron is to insist that EU migrants working in Britain are banned from claiming in-work benefits for four years as part of the UK’s new relationship with Brussels. The prime minister said he still wanted the controversial reform to be part of Britain’s new relationship with the EU, despite major difficulties in securing the move.

Pages

S'abonner à Journal Article