Family reunification

La tension entre le droit au regroupement familial prévu par les directives européennes et le souci des États membres de protéger leur souveraineté en régulant la migration a suscité une attention et une inquiétude accrues, notamment concernant les relations familiales frauduleuses (en particulier les mariages de complaisance). Cette contribution se penche sur les formes de contrôle autorisées dans la perspective du droit européen et se questionne à savoir si les pratiques nationales sont conformes au droit européen et aux droits fondamentaux.

The tension between the right to family reunification as laid down in European Directives and Member States’ concern to protect their sovereignty in regulating migration has resulted in growing attention to and concern about fraudulent family relationships (especially marriages of convenience). This contribution addresses the question of what forms of control are permissible from a European law perspective and whether national practices are in conformity with European law and fundamental rights. 

This study seeks to consider how marriage migration to the UK has been regulated from 1900 to the present day, as well as analysing some of the contributory factors to and consequences of such regulation. Immigration in general often raises acute tensions across political boundaries and marriage migrants have raised particular socio-political issues which various administrations have attempted to address over the years. Issues of race, gender, culture and identity and different theorisations of the limits of state power in this area have all been instrumental in contributing to the regulation of marriage migration since the early 1900s.

This research investigates the ways in which marriage migration, which was relatively insignificant in the early phases of post-War immigration, has become the object of intense state scrutiny and the site of political interventions in the past twenty years, as family-related migration became the main legal mode of entry in Western Europe, Canada and the United States (Kraler, 2010). Such interventions have taken different forms, and have become increasingly debated. Indeed, they seem to pit what many deem to be a fundamental principle in Western democracies, namely the right to family life (at least for established citizens), against calls and pressures for tightened migration policies. 

The Government of Canada has removed the condition that applied to some sponsored spouses or partners of Canadian citizens and permanent residents to live with their sponsor in order to keep their permanent resident status.

Le gouvernement du Canada a éliminé la condition selon laquelle certains époux ou partenaires parrainés par des citoyens canadiens ou des résidents permanents devaient vivre avec leur répondant afin de conserver leur statut de résident permanent.

From academic, policy, and sponsors’ perspectives, what is known about the private sponsorship of refugees in Canada? Since its inception in the 1970s, the federal government has enabled the private sponsorship of tens of thousands of refugees across the country. From the outset, the government pledged to resettle one refugee for every privately sponsored individual when the program was first introduced. Yet government plans for 2017 suggest there will be more privately sponsored refugees than government-assisted refugees. Riding a current wave of positive public opinion and high level of engagement in refugee sponsorship by private citizens in Canada, this brief provides a critical overview of what is known about private refugee sponsorship; identifies some gaps and areas of concern; and analyzes in brief negative impacts of policy changes to PSR processing made over the last five years.

C’est avec un immense plaisir que nous vous annoncons la parution du premier rapport de recherche réalisé dans le cadre du projet Migration de mariage et technologies de l’amour: comprendre la gouvernementalité de la migration de mariage en Europe et en Amérique du Nord dirigé par Anne-Marie D’Aoust, professeure au département de sciences politiques et membre du CRIEC de l’Université du Québec à Montréal.

This guidance tells you how to consider an application for a residence card made by a family member of a British citizen.

Several new guidance documents on EU law free movement cases have been published by the Home Office over the last few days.

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