Immigration

Plus de réfugiés et moins d'immigrants économiques. C'est ce qui ressort du plan d'immigration pour 2016 qui a été dévoilé ce matin par le gouvernement fédéral. Au cours de cette année, Ottawa compte accueillir environ 300 000 nouveaux résidents permanents au pays.

Un texte de Raphaël Bouvier-Auclair, Radio-Canada

Immigration Minister John McCallum says he’s planning on introducing changes in the “next couple of months” that will grant permanent resident status to the sponsored spouses of Canadians, immediately, upon arriving in Canada.

“When spouses come in now, they don’t immediately become permanent residents; there’s a two-year period where they are not yet permanent residents,” Mr. McCallum (Markham-Thornhill, Ont.) said in an interview with The Hill Times. “We said in our platform that we will end that so that they will become permanent residents on arrival.”

Les mariages mixtes ont toujours eu une relation ambiguë et souvent problématique avec la loi. D’une part, ils ont souvent été perçus comme étant un indicateur de l’intégration socio-culturelle dans la société. En termes juridiques, cette perception a été exprimée via un accès privilégié à la nationalité pour les membres des familles des citoyens. D’autre part, les mariages mixtes sont souvent vus comme représentant une menace à la société et la cohésion sociale. Dans cet article, Betty de Hart essaie de démontrer que les perceptions contradictoires des mariages mixtes ont influencé le développement du droit à la citoyenneté à travers le temps. 

Mixed marriages have always had an ambiguous and often problematic relationship with the law. On one hand, mixed marriages have been seen as a key indicator of sociocultural integration into mainstream society. In terms of the law, this perception has been expressed, for example, as privileged access to citizenship status for immigrant family members of citizens. 

According to IPS estimates, non-EU family migration to the UK increased from an average of 35,000 per year in the 1990s to 45,000 in 2013, or 20% of all non-EU immigration that year. These estimates include both dependents and family unification migrants. Family migration, like overall migration to the UK, increased from 1997 to the mid-2000s, peaking at 74,000 in 2006 (see figure 1). Also similar to other categories of migration, family migration declined in the second half of the 2000s. But these shifts in family migration were smaller in magnitude than similar shifts in migration for work or study. As a result of these trends, family migration comprises a smaller share of overall migration now than it did in the 1990s (see our the Migration Observatory briefing on Immigration by Category: Workers, Students, Family Members, Asylum Applicants). Although this briefing focuses on non-EU migration, it is worth noting that, including  EU nationals, family migration is now at similar levels to the 1990s. LTIM estimates of family migration were 90,000 in 1991 and averaged 75,000 during the 1990s. LTIM estimates had increased to 105,000 by 2006 but fell to 71,000 in 2013.

3.71 A surprisingly large number of those who attended the detainee forum I organised had been detained because of allegedly sham marriages. Most had been detained after Home Office interviews in Liverpool or Manchester. The questions they said they had been asked by caseworkers to ascertain whether their marriage was a sham included their knowledge of their wife’s National Insurance number, the colour of her underwear, and her bra size. If this was indeed the case, it is questionable whether such questions were either appropriate or useful. 

Les musulmanes qui ne maîtrisent pas suffisamment l'anglais pourraient être expulsées du Royaume-Uni, a mis en garde lundi le premier ministre David Cameron, justifiant sa menace par la lutte contre la ségrégation sexuelle.

David Cameron has been accused of stigmatising Muslim women after he announced plans to help them learn English and warned that migrant spouses who fail language tests may have to leave the UK.
Announcing the plans on Monday, the prime minister suggested the language classes for Muslim women could help stop radicalisation.

The government will resettle only about 10,000 Syrian refugees by the end of the year, or less than half the 25,000 promised by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during the election campaign. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship officials revealed the shortfall on Tuesday, as they presented the government’s plan for bringing the Syrian refugees to Canada. The entire 25,000 won’t arrive in Canada until the end of February, the officials said. The effort will cost as much as $678 million over six years.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the terror attacks in Paris raised some questions in the minds of Canadians about the Liberal promise to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees and the government wanted to ensure it was being “done right.”

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