Mobility/Immobility

After weeks of warnings about the dangers involved in Europe’s migrant influx, and fears about winter’s arrival, the worries of public officials and humanitarian groups were realized on Monday when thousands of asylum seekers, many of them families with small children, began to back up at crossings and were stranded in a chilly rain.

“We can’t welcome everybody,” a Bavarian-based newspaper wrote recently. Crowding thousands of people from different cultures into tents and hoping that they follow German customs was simply irresponsible. There were 1,000 criminal acts, 2,000 police interventions and 3,000 injuries over a two-week period alone. All this self-congratulatory talk of hospitality had to stop.

Stepping up European attempts to clear away hundreds of thousands of migrants whose asylum claims have been denied, E.U. leaders early Friday bolstered the powers of the pan-E.U. border agency to deport people.

Ce chapitre examine les circonstances dans lesquelles un mariage impliquant un conjoint migrant hors-EEA est désigné comme un simulacre de mariage afin que les droits de séjour soient refusés. Il analyse les problèmes de compréhension et de définition d’un faux mariage et fait valoir que les contrôles sur les mariages fictifs régulent souvent un plus large éventail de mariages que ceux conclus dans le seul but d'obtenir des droits de résidence.

This chapter investigates the circumstances in which a marriage involving a non- EEA migrant spouse is designated a sham marriage so that residence rights are refused. It analyses the problems of understanding and defining a sham marriage and argues that controls over sham marriages often regulate a much wider range of marriages than those entered for the sole purpose of obtaining residence rights.

While families all over the world enlist the help of family, friends, or paid day care for their children, the need to do so is especially strong for individual women (single or divorced) who work outside the home to earn a living. Women who migrate for work in another country, in search of better pay, may need to have children stay in the homes of others in the country of origin. That "good mothering" may take many forms was not initially recognized under Dutch immigration law. The approach in the Netherlands eventually brbought it into conflict with European human rights law and with the merging immigration law of the European Union (EU).

While families all over the world enlist the help of family, friends, or paid day care for their children, the need to do so is especially strong for individual women (single or divorced) who work outside the home to earn a living. Women who migrate for work in another country, in search of better pay, may need to have children stay in the homes of others in the country of origin. That "good mothering" may take many forms was not initially recognized under Dutch immigration law. The approach in the Netherlands eventually brbought it into conflict with European human rights law and with the merging immigration law of the European Union (EU).

Dans ce chapitre, je vais donner un bref survol des changements normatifs qui ont eu lieu aux Pays-Bas au cours de la seconde moitié du XXe siècle. Je vais évaluer ces changements aux développements qui ont eu lieu, au cours de la même période, à la régulation de la migration familiale aux Pays-Bas. Ensuite, je vais explorer la façon dont le régime de la migration familiale qui a pris forme à la fin du XXe siècle se rapporte à un nouveau contexte de la mondialisation comme théorisé par, entre autres, Sassen. Enfin, je vais questionner si et dans quelle mesure l'héritage raciste du passé colonial néerlandais se répercutent dans le contexte actuel.

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