US Supreme Court

The Obama administration asked the Supreme Court on Friday to reverse a lower court ruling that blocked the president's plan to defer deportation for as many as 5 million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

President Obama’s plan to shield millions of illegal immigrants from deportation may be in legal limbo, but that’s not stopping advocates for the undocumented, who are planning a new wave of events celebrating the initiative’s one-year anniversary.

Une nouvelle fois, il appartiendra aux neuf juges de la Cour suprême des États-Unis de se prononcer sur l'un des chantiers majeurs de la présidence Obama: après la réforme du système du santé en 2012, place à l'immigration en 2016.

A federal appellate court has delayed once again the Obama administration's controversial plans to grant some undocumented immigrants a reprieve from deportation. There is now a chance that the Supreme Court will consider the dispute sometime next year. In the meantime, some 4 million people living here illegally who had hoped for at least a temporary guarantee that they would be allowed to stay are still waiting.

  President Obama will ask the Supreme Court to clear the way for his far-reaching overhaul of the nation’s immigration system, administration lawyers said Tuesday, setting up a battle in the nation’s highest court over whether nearly five million undocumented immigrants can legally live and work in the United States.

The Obama administration said Tuesday it will ask the Supreme Court to reverse a lower court ruling and to back White House efforts to shield more than 4 million immigrants from deportation.

Cet article examine l'argument accidentel de procréation à travers le cadre de la théorie anthropologique, de l'histoire, de la littérature et de la loi constitutionnelle. Nous concluons que le mariage est parfois utilisé pour canaliser l'hétérosexualité masculine dans la reproduction, mais de faire valoir que cet objectif est la condition sine qua non du mariage est de simplifier considérablement son histoire à la fois dans la loi et de la culture.

This article examines the accidental procreation argument through the lenses of anthropological theory, history, literature, and constitutional law. We conclude that marriage has sometimes been used to channel male heterosexuality into reproduction, but to argue that this goal is the sine qua non of marriage is to vastly oversimplify its history in both law and culture.

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